Publications

Income and Poverty

Poverty in the Rural East of England

  • Published 1st May 2004
  • Authors: Guy Palmer,
  • Category: Income and Poverty

This report provides some evidence and analysis which help to quantify and understand the extent and nature of poverty and social exclusion in the rural parts of the East of England. It has been produced by the New Policy Institute on behalf of the Observatories Social Exclusion Partnership. The report is essentially a quantitative analysis of the problems, largely limited to the analysis and presentation of a variety of statistics. Wherever possible, it also provides some analyses on a geographical basis.

Key points include:

  • 400,000 people in rural East of England live in households which have an income below that used by central Government in monitoring progress on its income poverty targets. This is a sixth of the population.
  • Half of these people are living in households where someone is working. So, low income in rural East of England is not just about lack of paid work, it is also about low pay.
  • At least for older workers, official unemployment is by no means the whole story of lack of work – many are economically inactive but want paid work, with the largest group being people with a limiting longstanding illness.
  • A quarter of all children fail to achieve basic educational qualifications.
  • The largest statistics in the table are the number of people living more than 2 kilometres from their nearest supermarket and secondary school. While many of these people should not be considered to be social excluded, it illustrates the importance of the subject.
  • Similarly, there a large number of older people with a longstanding limiting illness. While many of these people may not be social excluded, it illustrates the importance of the older people in any analysis of social exclusion .

About this report
This report has been produced by the Guy palmer of the New Policy Institute on behalf of the Observatories Social Exclusion Partnership.